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Sport Matters Podcast: Fans 'Gone Wild' and Players' Rights

Why this matters

Sports as entertainment have dazzled fans for decades, but now that players in both college and professional levels are speaking out and demanding better treatment, the landscape of sports must shift with it.

Sport Matters episodes feature Global Sport Institute's Kenneth L. Shropshire and award-winning journalist William C. Rhoden. From academia to media, Ken and Bill discuss the edges of sport, unpacking race and culture beyond the game.

On the latest episode of the Global Sport Matters Podcast, Kenneth L. Shropshire and William C. Rhoden discuss the imbalance of sport as entertainment for fans and the disregard for the humans behind the jerseys. From the recent string of incidences - sports fans throwing popcorn on Russell Westbrook or a water bottle thrown at Kyrie Irving - to the ongoing battle for players' rights in college and the name, image and likeness ruling, the two hosts examine the roots of race, culture and the humanity of sports in the moment.

About the hosts:

Professor Kenneth L. Shropshire is CEO of the Global Sport Institute and the adidas Distinguished Professor of Global Sport at Arizona State University. He took on this current leadership role following  a thirty-year career as an endowed full professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

William C. Rhoden is a columnist and Editor-at-Large for The Undefeated, ESPN’s news site about sports, race, and culture. He is the curator of the Rhoden Fellows and is also the author of several books, including 40 Million Dollar Slaves: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Black Athlete. Before joining The Undefeated, Rhoden wrote an award-winning sports column for the New York Times and appeared as a guest on ESPN’s Sports Reporters for nearly 30 years. Rhoden began his journalism career as a news reporter at the Baltimore Afro American Newspaper. He was a senior editor with Ebony Magazine and then a columnist and jazz critic for the Baltimore Sun. Rhoden attended Morgan State University in Baltimore where he majored in English.

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